What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis?

DVT Affects Over 2 Million Americans. More Americans die from DVT than breast cancer, AIDS and traffic fatalities - combined.

DVT is a blood clot that forms in a vein in the body

Most deep vein blood clots occur in the lower leg or thigh. They also can occur in other parts of the body. A blood clot in a deep vein can break off and travel through the bloodstream. The loose clot is called an embolus (EM-bo-lus). It can travel to an artery in the lungs and block blood flow. This condition is called pulmonary embolism (PULL-mun-ary Em-bo-lizm), or PE. PE is a very serious condition. It can damage the lungs and other organs in the body and cause death.

Warning Signs Of DVT & Pulmonary Embolism (PE)

Deep Vein Thrombosis – or DVT – is one of the most serious, yet least-publicized health issues around. In fact, according to the Center for Disease Control, as many as 900,000 Americans contract DVT every year, and about 100,000 die when a pulmonary embolism develops.

Pain or tenderness in an extremity of groin

Change in the color of the leg

Sudden swelling of the leg

Chest Pain while breathing

Blood clots cause more risk of PE post-surgery

Blood clots also can form in veins closer to the skin's surface. However, these clots won't break off and cause PE. Many factors determine your risk five to 10 days after surgery. With today's shorter hospital stays, that's most likely when you're recovering at home and away from the watchful eye of your health care providers. Therefore, it's vital that life-saving DVT prevention doesn't end at the time of discharge after surgery - but continues at the home throughout your most vulnerable days. Your physician can prescribe DVT prevention that you can use at home, including both mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis.

DVT Prevention: Healthy Lifestyle & Regular Checkups

To lower your risk and help prevent DVT, take these steps:
Maintain an active lifestyle and exercise regularly - daily, if possible. Walking, swimming and bicycling are all great activites.
Get your blood pressure checked regularly; take steps to lower it, if necessary.
Manage weight with exercise as well as by eating a healthy diet.
Report any family or personal history of blood clotting problems to your doctor.
If you smoke, quit! Nicotine therapy (in patches, gums, or sprays) and support groups can make this much easier to do.
Discuss alternatives to birth control pills or hormone-replacement therapy with your doctor.

Leading Mobile Prevention is Here

Many factors determine your risk for DVT, but studies show you're at highest risk five to ten days after surgery. That's most likely when you're recovering at home and away from the watchful eye of your health care providers. Therefore, it's vital that life-saving DVT prevention doesn't end at the time of discharge after surgery - but continues at home throughout your most vulnerable days. Your physician can prescribe DVT prevention that you can use at home, such as our tubeless and cordless DVT Prevention device called Circul8.

We are the #1 Standard of Care for DVT Prevention, providing hospitals the most efficient DVT program nationwide by decreasing your workload, increasing patient outcomes and providing the most compliant program for your clinic, center or hospital.

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